Rare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide brooch

Rare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide brooch

 

This type of jewel is called a Stuart crystal. Stuart crystals were mounted in all sort of jewelry, from pins, rings, slides, bracelets and more. Most of the Stuart crystals that survived over the ages are the slide variety, like this one. They became popular in England after 1649, with the execution of the then King of England, Charles I. His loyalists, (the royalists) who wanted to show their sympathy for their fallen monarch would wear small slides set with his portrait or a tress of hair and his initials (in fine gold wire) underneath a faceted crystal.

To find a Stuart crystal slide in this quality with these colors and the depicted scene is really rare, even for us. It is with great pride that we can offer this true collector’s item here at our site.

Rare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide broochRare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide broochRare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide broochRare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide broochRare enameled antique Stuart Crystal slide brooch

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All olives are equal

All olives are equal…(but some are more equal than others)

Belle Epoque diamond flexible bracelet by Emile Olive from the antique jewelry collection of Adin Antique Jewelry Store, Antwerp, Belgium

One of a kind antique bracelet set with 7.20 carat diamonds and crafted by the illustrious Emile Olive. This very bracelet is depicted in the “Bible of Antique Jewelry” namely Henri Vever’s “La Bijouterie Française au XIXe Siècle” (third volume, page 533) and in its English translation “French Jewelry of the Nineteenth Century” (page 1025).

Belle Epoque diamond flexible bracelet by Emile Olive from the antique jewelry collection of Adin Antique Jewelry Store, Antwerp, Belgium

Henri Vever writes about Emile Olive:
“Emile Olive (1853-1902) succeeded Le Saché as designer in Falize’s firm. An artist of lively intelligence and infinite taste, he spent thirty years applying body and soul to our beloved art. It is obvious that Olive’s gift for geometry was hardly appreciated by his father, an accountant, since he sent him to work with a cheese and bean seller in Rue de la Verrerie.

Such an environment seemed hardly likely to foster the development of an artistic vocation. However the young man felt such a need to draw and had such a hightly developed sense of decoration that he even found curious ornamental motifs in the stains and fissures of the the old shop walls and in the mould on the cheeses of his employer!”

Belle Epoque diamond flexible bracelet by Emile Olive from the antique jewelry collection of Adin Antique Jewelry Store, Antwerp, Belgium

The Belle Époque (French for “Beautiful Era”) was a period in European social history that began during the late 19th century and lasted until World War I. Occurring during the time of the French Third Republic and the German Empire, the “Belle Époque” was named in retrospect, when it began to be considered a “golden age” the major powers of Europe, new technologies improved lives and the commercial arts adapted Renaissance and eighteenth-century styles to modern forms. This epoch overlaps the end of what is called the Victorian Era there and the period named the Edwardian Era.

Romantic Victorian Jewelry, Antique painted miniature enameled pin diamond

Originally the term “Victorian jewelry” was designated for articles of jewelry made in the United Kingdom during the reign of Queen Victoria, but not all of the many varieties produced during her long reign, 1837-1901, are now generally classified as Victorian jewelry. These days in the international antique jewelry trade the pieces now called Victorian jewelry are not necessarily made in the United Kingdom. The term “Victorian Jewelry” became a term used for European jewelry made in the 19th century rather then the description of a certain style-movement in a specific country.

Large band Victorian gold ring rose cut diamonds 1840-1850

Here is a fine craftsmanship antique ring in gold considered to be of the Romantic Victorian Period with a large comfortable band featuring nine rose cut diamonds set in marquise shape; the rose cuts are set on foil, this is a special technique that was used to bring the lustre of the diamonds to its best quality. The ring presents elegant floral patterns and one small golden ball on each side of the setting.

The jewel is made of silver on top and backed with 18kt red gold; this technique finds its origin centuries ago, when jewelers believed that only a silver mounting could render the true beauty of a diamond. Backing the silver jewel with a (thin) layer of gold was a practical precaution taken to avoid the silver jewelry leaving black stains on clothing or skin.

During the 1840s, while the young Queen Victoria’s influence on jewel fashions was emerging, patterns for gold-work very much revolved around the natural world. These motifs suited feminine delicacy and the purely ornamental woman. In this era of peace and prosperity, wealth was displayed in jewels and especially in a sumptuous spread of gold, rich scrolls, pierced, strap-work, or gold twigs twisted and entwined with foliage.

Victorian decorative arts refers to the style of decorative arts during the Victorian era. The Victorian era is known for its eclectic revival and interpretation of historic styles and the introduction of cross-cultural influences from the middle east and Asia in furniture, fittings, and Interior decoration. Victorian design is widely viewed as having indulged in a regrettable excess of ornament. The Arts and Crafts movement, the aesthetic movement, Anglo-Japanese style, and Art Nouveau style have their beginnings in the late Victorian era.

Antique rose cut diamonds ring Ref.11035-0021

diamonds, silver, 18kt red gold

date: 1840-1850

origin: most probably Belgium

top of ring: 1.20 cm (0.47 inch) x 1.60 cm (0.63 inch)

weight: 6.50 grams

Size: US 7½

Vernier, famous French medaillist

E. Vernier is a famous French medaillist, that was one of the foremen of the revival of the medaillist art in France around 1886. He was also a collaborator of Falize (other famous French jeweller) and awarded the prestigious “Medal of Honor at the Salon”.

A similar pin is depicted in the famous “jewelry bible” by Henri Vever “French Jewelry of the Nineteenth Century” in the English translation on page 1048.

Diamonds antique cross pendant Flemish Antwerp silver gold 1831-1850

Pendant cross type “Flemish” or “Antwerp” in silver on top and backed with 18K red gold, set with 16 rose cut diamonds in close setting. The rose cuts are set on foil, this is a special technique that was used to bring the lustre of the diamonds to its best quality.

This jewel is a fine example of the skill and craftsmanship of jewelers in Antwerp in the 18th and 19th century. The city was well known for centuries for its wealth which resulted in sumptuous jewels set with diamonds. The influence of religion was very present in those days, the refinement, the materials and the stones reinforced this sign of devotion. This type of cross was worn on a long silver chain and was a very expensive gift worn by pretty women in the north of Belgium in the first half of the 19th century.

The technique “silver on top and backed with 18K red gold” finds its origin centuries ago, when jewelers believed that only a silver mounting could render the true beauty of a diamond. Backing the silver jewel with a (thin) layer of gold was a practical precaution taken to avoid the silver jewelry leaving black stains on clothing or skin.

Most of these crosses are now owned by the church or in private collections.

Cross “Anversoise” ref.10343-0049

diamonds, silver, 18 carats red gold

control mark letter ‘E’

date: 1831-1850

origin: Belgium – Antwerp

height: 3.48 cm (1.37 inch)

weight: 3.50 grams