Love in flower symbolism

French Late Victorian Early Art Nouveau Necklace Full Of Love Symbolism

In the late 19th, early 20th century there was a revival of the use of symbolic meanings of plants and flowers. Nature seemed to be a forest of symbols, and flowers were saturated with deeper meanings.

As is the case with the late 19th century French elegant necklace we show here. We clearly recognize an ivy. But what is so romantic about the ivy you would say. The romantic facet of ivy is based upon its tendrils which attach to a wall in a way that can be explained as affectionately. In France one would give a piece of jewelry with ivy depicted on it while saying “Je m’attache ou je meurs” which (freely) translates to “I will cling to you or I will die”…

This hidden meaning is what we like about our antique jewelry, it gives the piece an extra depth. The added emotional value that is not necessary obvious to all but just between the donor and the receiver.

Click the picture to get to the descriptive page of this jewel.

Flowers are love’s truest language

Magnificent Art Deco engagement ring with rubies and diamonds

Magnificent Art Deco engagement ring with rubies and diamonds

(But sometimes even the truth needs a little help)

Flowers are part of our daily life. For virtually every event we have assigned a special flower. Flowers for love, church, church graveyard, marriage, etc. In the 16th century inn’s use to have a branch or flower stalk as signboard which later often changed only into the name of a specific tree or flower. Many times one finds flower gardens in mythological sceneries. The allegoric use of flowers is uncountable: attributes for the springtime, the youth, the sunrise, the rhetoric, the virtue etc. Lots of countries carry a flower as national symbol: Hungary had the tulip and Scotland the thistle, etc.

Click the picture to see a close-up of this magnificent Art Deco ring.